Friday Reads: The “It’s What Goats Do” Edition

From the “Fabrication and Impermanence” chapter of What Makes You Not a Buddhist by Dzongsar Jamyang Khyentse:

Consider cooking a hen’s egg. Without constant change, the cooking of an egg cannot occur. The cooked-egg result requires some fundamental causes and conditions. Obviously you need an egg, a pot of water, and some sort of heating element. And then there are some not-so-essential causes and conditions, such as a kitchen, lights, an egg timer, a hand to put the egg into the pot. Another important condition is absence of interruption, such as a power outage or a goat walking in and overturning the pot.

I love that last line. Freakin’ goats….

Answering the Age-Old Travel Question

Having spent a couple nights aboard, could I live here?

“The Meadowlark”

Yes. Yes, I could.

Highlights included the outdoor shower (particularly in the rain), all the mist of the Olympic Peninsula, and the visiting barred owl.

 

She’s a 1938 ‘classic’ and curvaceous 40′ wooden cruiser. Charming bathroom, kitchen and sleeping quarters. Experience the ultimate in comfortable cruising. She sits high and dry in her own meadow surrounded by dark green forest. Bon voyage.

Rich warm solid mahogany. Relive the yachting world of the 40’s in this spacious wooden bridge deck cruiser of Lake Union heritage, designed in the spirit of famous Seattle marine architect, Ed Monk. Enjoy cocktails on the dock overlooking your own private meadow. Quiet and secluded, for a good nights sleep.

She is a classic ‘antique’ boat, not actually built for optimum overnight accommodations. She has such features as areas of low head room, several steps up and down to various levels, and an attendant salty boat ambiance. Boat people and adventurers love her, but she may not be appropriate for everyone.

Awake in the World

Taking a break from the break I’ve taken from the online world to mention this: Awake in the World: Riverfeet Press Anthology, a “collection of stories, essays, and poems about wildlife, adventure, and the environment, from over forty authors, both U.S. and abroad.” I mention it because I am one of those authors, via an essay I wrote called “A Path to the Wild.”

A short excerpt:

Those summer days fading into nights outside didn’t always lead to bucolic campouts. These were the 70s; my ear for stories of UFOs and cattle mutilations would make me wake wide-eyed with fear should I hear an airplane or, even worse, a helicopter pass overhead in the darkness. With the 1975 release of Jaws, I was frightened to swim in nearby Frenchtown Pond, though I did it anyway, for fear of teeth from the deep. In the wake of that predator-as-villain film, there were a rash of copycats. One was a movie called Grizzly, which I didn’t see, whose ads featured copy describing the beast as “18 feet of gut-crunching, man-eating terror!” I asked my dad how tall 18 feet was, and he pointed high up on the side of the house and said, “About that high.” For nights after I lay in my sleeping bag staring at the side of the old place, dumbstruck that an animal could be so gigantic, waiting for it to come and drag me away.

The book has just come available for the pre-release sales price of $13. Support small independent presses and order one, if you are so inclined, HERE. And let me know what you think!